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Search Results 76 to 101 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)
the british prime minister's information, the royal family, victims of crimes in great britain and others attempting to do the same thing with an investigator here in the united states. i see a member of parliament speak to that as well. and i see scotland yard having an investigation of over 5,000 names and several thousand phone numbers. that adds up to me to sufficient enough concern to protect the families of 9/11 and make sure that either this was not true, in which case they can have that sense of security, that their messages from those loved ones on their final days does not in any way revealed. or if it is true, that it should be prosecuted in the united states because access to phone record, unauthorized access to them is punishable under federal law. >> senator jay rockefeller says my bet is we'll find criminal stuff here. you share that view? >> well, i don't want to jump to conclusions, john, but i do want a vigorous review. i see there are some published reports that the fbi is in fact pursuing a review to determine whether a full investigation is necessary. i welcome that.
. siemens. answers. >>> another blockbuster headline today in great britain's tabloid hacking scandal. the media barren rupert murdoch and his top deputies summoned before parliament next week. today a top police official said that it's highly possible that officials sold secrets to murdoch's newspapers. >> reporter: the multifaceted phone hacking scandal is suddenly focused on current and former police officers at london's scotland yard. called before plig politicians answer accusations of systemic incompetence and their answers are telling. >> we know that, there always will be. >> reporter: so who did take bribes? among those questioned, former police officer andy hayman who now writes for "news international." ironic that he led a criticized investigation against the company for phone hacking in 2006. >> while a police officer, did you ever receive payment from any news -- >> good god! absolutely not. i can't believe you suggested that. >> lots of people -- >> come on. absolutely no way. i can say to you -- >> mr. hayman -- >> no, come on, chairman, that's not fair. >> the police
, the level of economic interdependence between britain and germany was such that it was in some ways madness these two countries went to war. there was a very famous book written by a young historian who talked about the fact that perhaps britain should not have gone to war. that this was craziness for britain to do it and it was the pity of war. wait a minute. that historian was niall ferguson. >> yes, before we end the rebuttal portion of this debate, i'd like to allow dr. kissinger the last word. >> i don't know whether one can reverse the order of participants up here, because i think it's three to one against my friend niall. our chinese friend is saying that china has suffered a great deal, has been provoked through a century of western exploitations and that it's not trying to dominate the world. as i understand what he is saying it is this -- when the west wants to discuss climate or the financial assistance, our tendency is to say china can be a stakeholder. it can be a participant in a system they did not themselves participate in creating. so the issue is whether it is possible to
broke the story a few weeks ago. my website. basically they are going to fly the flag for britain and pass around the hat for their various charities. prince william is going to play the polo match. they are going to a a new media conference and they are hosting a black tie dinner for the film industry. >> for british film industry. they are coming all this way across the pond and they are only going to be in california. why is that? >> california traditionally royal family goes, queen's visited and -- prince andrew's visit a pew years ago. and -- it is a place where they would like to raise money for their charities also because it is -- very affluent and influential state. they can get hold of moverers and shakers will. >> i got you. they are going to be meeting saturday with a bunch of celebs at the gala. meeting with tom hanks and nicole kidman will be there as well. >> new film desperate to sell as well. >> right. i mean -- lot has been made of this that they are down to earth and really mingle well with people and are a sensation wherever they go. now they are going to be ru
and i came here with great respect for all of you, the parliament and people of britain you represent. this is the most humble day of my career. and all that has happened i know that we needed to be here today. james and i would like to see how sorry we are for what has happened especially with regard to people's crime. >> our company has 52,000, i fled for 57 years and i've made my share of mistakes many countries and hard-working journalists. i learned that nearly 200 newspapers come for different sizes and countless stories of the families of the world at no time do i remember being as second as when the family had to endure which i think his last. nor do i have recall things as angry as when i was told that the news of the world could have compounded their distress. i want to thank keefer graciously giving me the opportunity to apologize in person. i would like all the victims of the phone hacking to know how completely and deeply sorry i am. apologizing cannot take place with his happened but still, i want them to know my regret of the horrible invasions' of their lives. i unders
. yesterday britain's prime minister said it wasn't just foot dragging by the police. >> the truth is, to coin a phrase, we've all been in this together, the press, the politicians and leaders of all the passes, yes, including me. >> reporter: while "the news of the world" will print its last edition tomorrow, the fallout from this affair has just begun. on the business side, a multibillion-dollar takeover bid by the murdoch family of a huge satellite television operation here in britain has already been delayed and it could be in serious trouble. russ? >> elizabeth palmer in london, thank you. >>> and joining us from london is steve eulitz and mark lewis, lawyer for the family of 13-year-old milly dowler whose phone was hacked after her murder, the incident that ignited the scandal. nothing is going to bring back their little girl but is the dowler family getting any satisfaction by the fact that "news of the world" is closing? >> there's no really satisfaction. it was cruelty upon cruelty that the announcement of "news of the world" was ceasing without them being warned about this, they tend
-war britain yts. and a professor looks at the issues of civil rights in the early 199 's. get the complete weekend schedule at c-span.org/history. this weekend on c-span -- live from salt lake city, the nation's governors look at the lessons of 9/11, and the featured speaker, thomas friedman, talks competitiveness and the economy. look for live coverage saturday at 5:30 eastern and sunday at 1:30 eastern. the national governors association, this weekend online on c-span radio and on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: on your screen is congressman john carter, republicans of texas, and as i mentioned before the break, he is a member of the house appropriations committee and also serves as secretary leadership position to the republican conference in the house. well, there's a headline, congressman, on politico, panicky hill scramble for deal. are you feeling a sense of panic about the situation? guest: there's a lot of tension. you can't deny the tension that is everywhere. a lot of the debate is taking place behind closed doors. many people are wondering what's going on. they
bombing of a pan am flight over scotland. to lenders 70 people died authorities in britain released from prison on the grounds that he had cancer and only had a few months to live. are there is a lot of heavy flooding in china, a sudden downpour left the streets of beijing swat. the city's training system is not good, water levels reached for a half feet in some places very quickly. there were a lot of stalled cars and stranded drivers crews have managed to clear up most of the mess. >> checking traffic this is the camera and walnut creek, the 680-24 interchange, traffic is moving at a crawl. this is a different picture, north bound south bound maze at the bottom of your screen. we will be back with more news ahead including tech news, stay with us. [ male announcer ] this... is the montrose pet hospital -- montrose, california. in here, anarchy meets order. working with at&t, doctors set up a broadband solution to handle data and a mobility app to stay connected with their business. so they can run the office... even when they're not in the office. call at&t and see what we can do for
that this teenage girl in britain went missing in 2002 and later found ted. we are understanding what is emerging now the last day and today is that the phone of a journalist allegedly at "news of the world" allegedly hacked into her mobile phone and then deleted messages from her voice mail. according to these accusations and allegations, many messages were left on her voice mail on friends and relatives appealing her to contact them. they were, obviously, very distressed that she had been missing. then those messages, especially the ones left within the first couple of days she was missing, were deleted, allegedly by the journalist of news of the world," which is owned by rupert murdoch's empire and directors of the news international are meeting with british police today. they are saying they want to cooperate with any sort of investigation. of course, this has police and, of course, the family of millie dalor extremely angry and many describing the situation as heinous as this, obviously, could affect the investigation as it was taking place. >> we will follow the investigation. >>> duty-free
saw the conflict with britain, what was the sugar act? it was something, it was a law passed to favor the british sugar planters, this wealthy group of men who mostly live in london and hobnob with members of parliament. what's the stamp act? the an act to pass taxes from the rich -- namely the british -- to the poor which you always are when you're about to be taxed, but the poor, midling colonist. and the tea act, what is it? is it's favoritism on behalf of parliament for the shareholders of the east india tea company. so there's the government being oppressive, the parliament, and i think it's important to understand what the revolution was about for many ordinary patriots was this effort to set up governments of their own, that their problem was that their governments lacked the power to protect the people and promote their prosperity. and that to understand the movement solely as anti-government is to understand it really halfway and partly from the point of view of the most well-to-do who are always the ones who can do without less government and not from the point of view of th
what that music means? royal action for you on a friday morning. brita britain's duke and duchess of europe. cbs news reporter is in ottawa this morning, lucie van oldenbarneveld has more. >> reporter: thousands of very excited onlookers greeted the duke and duchess of cambridge and waiting hours to do so them and they sure didn't disappoint. prince william and catherine stepped off a canadian military plane early in the afternoon on thursday into brilliant sunshine and brisk winds an adoring crowd. >> oh, my heart stopped a beat! i was so excited! i was jumping and screaming! love them. >> reporter: after meeting prime minister stephen harper, their first stop was a national war memorial to lay a wreath and visit the troops. then a speech in french. william apologized for his language skills and promised he would get better. >> it will improve as we go on. >> reporter: a scheduled barbecue with 120 canadian volunteers were moved indoor because of the rain. there, the couple mingled with the crowd. kate who is not scheduled to speak publicly during the trip seemed to have plenty t
opposed to obamacare because i lived under national health in britain for three years and i know what happens. eu end up with a ration care. this last saturday on my program i had a nurse practitioner call in from arkansas who said that already they are being turned down for treatments. they request treatment and are being turned down under medicare because the person is terminal. since they are terminal, the treatment is not worth giving. they suffer and die. there is a woman going blind and that she cannot get treatment for her element that is causing her to go blind, because she is terminal. dr. berwick, put in a recess appointment ito be the head of medicare, is it in a love affair with the british system. they deny people 59.5 because it is not a good investment. even president obama said it was perhaps not the best use of resources to give his grandmother and a hip replacement after she was diagnosed with terminal ccer. i guess she could hobble around in panama she was dying of cancer. that is a -- not the kindh -- whilee around in pain b she was dying of cancer. that is not the
. it includes drugs like borrow sa prozac. >>> a study published in britain find women sitting for long periods of time could develop deadly blood clots in their lungs. those who spent 41 hours or more a week sitting when they weren't at work were twice as likely to develop a potentially life threaten pulmonary embolism. >> >>> new research found chantix may increase your risk of heart disease. >> joining us is senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. if it worked to stop you smoking, is the risk worth it and then you don't take it once you you've stopped smoking? tell us how this is working out. >> each person is different. it really depends. some people take this drug and it helps them quit smoking and they are able to continue taking it. other people take this drug and maybe it helps them quit smoking but maybe it also makes them more likely to have a heart attack, and so you have to talk to your doctor and figure out sort of, you know, help think about which camp you might fall into, how long do you want to take the drug for. there's so many different things in play. ali, i want to tel
that murdoch chose to save her rather than one of britain's oldest newspapers. at age 80, murdoch's once bulletproof reputation has been shaken. >> the reports that this is the end of murdoch or this is the death of murdoch in a business sense are probably overstated. but it does give one pause to see a scandal of this proportion really spiral out of control. >> reporter: hacking the phones of celebrities and politicians was one thing. but harvesting the grieving voicemails of ordinary people dealing with tragedy triggered an explosion of revulsion that could not be contained. with advertisers abandoning the paper, its closing will put some 200 employees out of work and there are publish reports today that there are more arrests coming, perhaps within days, several investigations now under way. >> nbc's mike taibbi, thanks so much, mike. 7:13. once again here's david. >>> ann, thanks. it is likely to be the number one issue in the 2012 presidential election as we've been talking about it, it is the economy and the struggling job market. both president obama and the republican contenders
the government is ignoring is the fact that our power grid is ready to go down in 10 years or less. great britain is out one year or less. if that power system goes down, those systems you have built up will not be able to operate. people will lose food. stores will lose food. restaurants will lose food. this happened in world war ii when hitler was in power. they rationed power at 3 days a week. you could not keep food in your refrigerator to last. it is my understanding it would take $1 billion to correct this problem. think of the job creation it would create. guest: great point. there are probably a lot of projects like that to be addressed. the first thing is we have to get a pathway to balance. if we do not do that, we do not have money to do anything. your point is to have congress did into the issues, determine priorities. then let them determine the spending that needs to take place for long-term sustainability of our economy, services, and country. host: bruce cook, the tea party has increased your ideas. guest: we are bipartisan. tosuppaccept anyone who wants support this. i was at a b
falls through. but a publisher in britain says it was still expected to publish the book. coming up, we continue our discussion about the debt talks. president obama is meeting with congressional leadership today at the white house. we have a senator coming up, a republican from mississippi, senator roger wicker, but up next, one of the leaders in the house on the democratic side, xavier bacerra. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> who is really going to be going to get fired up over nancy pelosi or john boehner? they are proxies' or shorthands for the incredibly narrow range of choice that we have in an elected officials. >> in "the declaration of independents." reason deede's nick gillespie takes on the two-party system and possible libertarian solutions. sunday night on "q&a." >> this weekend on book tv on c- span2, is everything you know about the ok corral wrong? jeff guinn tells a different story. on "after words," charles hill looks at the long war of islamism against the state system. and foreign min
new book, classified, secrecy in the state and post-war britain. and the professionor looks at civil rights in the early 1990s. get the complete schedule. >> live from sthracks, the nation's governors look at the lessons of 9/11 and freedman talks about competitiveness and the economy. the national governors association, this weekend, on line on c-span radio and on c-span. >> i'm very interested in what i call disappearing america. america that may not be here 25 years from now. >> for 30 years carol has traveled the united states documenting the country through her photo lens. follow her story. sunday night on quanchquanch. it's a prelude to the documentary, the library of congress. >> it's all available to you on t vision, radio, on line. and find our content any time through c-span's video library. and we take it on the road with our digital bus and local content vehicle. it's washington your way. the c-span networks. now available more than 100 million homes. provided as a public service. "washington journal" continues. host: we're joined by pedro of reuters. as you look at the u
. a controversial in vitro lottery will launch in britain giving protective parents winning thousands of dollars towards expensive fertility treatment. tickets of the so-called game will be sold online, and every month. some are now calling the lottery wrong and entirely inappropriate. and this isn't your average invitation, a marine asked mila kuhnous out on a date from afghanistan. >> and just want to one thing i'd like to ask you, like you, on november 18th, from greenville, north carolina with yours truly. take a second, think about it, get back to me. >> wow, the sergeant's got more of the 3rd battalion, 2nd marines posted this on youtube and we don't know if she's watched it yet. no word on her response. those are your headlines. now, time for the 7th annual wounded warrior, injured troops in afghanistan gathered and everything from scuba diving, kayaking, water skiing and more. rick reichmuth is trying to keep up. >> exactly the 7th year this event has been doing on and joined by will parker, you lost your leg on may 31st, i think may 31st and that's a few weeks ago. >> yeah, about four o
guidelines are no near as forceful as some countries like france, britain and israel that has proposed legislation for companies to identify when their ads have been altered. some celebrities have spoken about extreme retouching. kate winslet took legal action for making her too thin and brad pitt ask his "w" magazine cover not be retouched. i got to tell you that sometimes i think my life would be better if i was 10 pounds thinner. how messed up is that? i told that to the ama guy and he says, blame these magazines. >> you don't need retouching quite frankly and i do blame the magazines for making you think that you must be perfect. magazines won't go along with this. with any change, right? >> yeah, the ama is hoping that they'll listen to these guidelines and the girl scouts of america loved what they're doing but the reality of the situation is, you know, photographers and the media and the campaigns really don't want to change anything. >> so talking about the 10 pounds, when the guy made your face fatter. >> he made -- it was really cool set called portrait professional, the p
Search Results 76 to 101 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)